HTML Website Imports


#1

Hi All…

Just checking to see if I have misunderstood? I know we can view and interact with a live website, but are we able to import a website in total (needing to import a Muse website)? Would love help and advice as I’ve got a few sites to move away from Adobe Muse!

Thank you all in advance! :slight_smile:


#2

Hi,

Welcome to the forums @greenskin.

1.] You should be able to Export your site to source from Muse.
2.] Then open the site as a Project using the Pro version of Pinegrow.


Projects (Old documentation screenshots, but relative info):
http://docsbeta.pinegrow.com/projects/

Here is a video showing the difference of the interface, that may help with the above document:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5m4NiI7uS2I


The Pinegrow Developers mentioned this previously, so assumedly they tested a few Muse sites?


Hope that helps you in some way.

:evergreen_tree: :heart:


#3

I don’t want to discourage you, but unfortunately, I have to. I took a look at a few websites built with Adobe Muse that are showcased on their “Site of the day” page. This is one such site…

http://www.thehangargroup.com/

I couldn’t open the home page from the web in Pinegrow. It informed me of HTML errors and basically choked. I was able to open one of the other pages like… http://www.thehangargroup.com/what.html

All I can say is, I feel deeply sorry for anyone who ever has to work with this website outside of Muse. The code wasn’t just bad, it was AWFUL. The way things are setup is absolutely bizarre. The navigation menu, for example, isn’t a list element, it was a series of links with the text set as p elements. They weren’t even in order in the code. Weird. The number of div and span elements was, well, dizzying (divvying?)

There were external stylesheets, but also a great deal of inline styling was used. (BAD) I would guess that Muse just styles whatever changes the user makes to its stock elements right on the page, as opposed to changing them in the stylesheets. Yuck! I don’t even want to get into the on page SEO (or should I say, lack thereof.) Although not specifically the program’s fault, you would think it would at least guide you towards using proper headings. On the home page of this site, the heading tags were as follows…

H2 - Get on our mailing list
H3 - by one of our sales representatives
H3 - please fill in the form.

There was no H1 heading, which is arguably the second most important piece of on page SEO a website can have.

Unless you have absolutely no choice, I would seriously reconsider rebuilding your Muse sites in Pinegrow using one of the included foundations, like Bootstrap. You could always do screengrabs of the old site, and use Pinegrow’s wonderful image overlay feature to recreate them.

Good luck to you.


#4

Thanks Pinegrow_User! :slight_smile:

I have completed what you suggested and all works. I’m still trying to work out the breakpoints flow and how I can make changes per selected breakpoint - I’ll keep on looking… thanks.


#5

I know… It also comes back to how skilled and knowing we were with the application, but I’m not going to defend the propriety code in any way! In the end it is a mess!
I guess this is the result of a free-flowing canvas as opposed to grids, but then I have come across another free-flowing canvas web design application and within reason it is producing really good clean semantic html/CSS3.

In the end I will need to re-build all the Muse websites I created because I’m leaving Adobe and their new found one-eyed business model so I have a lot of work ahead of me! And thanks for the heads up with the image overlay feature! :slight_smile:


#6

Would you care to share which “free-flowing” web application you found? My guess would be you’re talking about Webflow. I don’t know much about the program other than that it’s cloud-based software based on bootstrap. I took a look at some of their templates, and the underlying code looks good. Light years cleaner than Muse.

The downsides that I immediately see are the cloud-based editor, and the cost. A long time ago, I used a cloud-based editor when I first started my business, and it was an absolute nightmare. Laggy, buggy, and if for any reason I lost my internet, I couldn’t work. At least Webflow lets you export it’s code. That’s a big plus. It also seems to have a good interface for dealing with javascript and animations. It’s the price tag that makes it less attractive to me. I don’t like paying for software “forever.” It’s one of the reasons I ditched Adobe after CS6.

It’s not really clear if Webflow can do anything that Pinegrow cannot, though it may be able to do certain things a little easier by virtue of its interface. With Pinegrow, I still have to go in and tweak code from time-to-time to get things just as I want them, but then that precisely why I like it.

If it’s not Webflow, I’d like to know to which program you’re referring?


#7

No its not Webflow! I’m not keen on their business model but the app is of good quality. I would love to see a more refined client editing interface for Pinegrow like what Webflow has on offer, but I also know that Webflow is server-side and Pinegrow is static HTML which I prefer.

The free-flowing canvas application I was talking about is Sparkle, and the code it generates is very similar to Bootstrap Studio. I’m aware its developers are making some big changes to it shortly! I’m leaving my options open this time because the experience with Adobe and Muse has left a foul taste in my mouth! :frowning: